What is Mesothelioma?

Malignant Mesothelioma is the most serious of all asbestos-related diseases. It is a rare form of cancer in which malignant cells are found in the sac lining of the chest (pleura) or abdomen (peritoneum). Virtually all cases of malignant mesothelioma are attributable to asbestos exposure.

An x-ray is often the first method used in the diagnosis of mesothelioma. Although mesothelioma typically cannot be seen on an x-ray, the tumor often causes a pleural effusion, or fluid collection between the lung and chest wall. This abnormal finding is associated with shortness of breath and warrants clinical followup. For confirmation of the disease a pathology specimen from a biopsy or operation is usually required. Like most cancers, malignant mesothelioma is best treated when it is diagnosed early. Mesothelioma progresses through stages. In the early stages, the cancer is found in the lining of the chest cavity, the lining of the lung or the lining of the abdominal cavity. In the advanced stages of mesothelioma, the cancer spreads beyond the lining of the chest or abdomen to lymph nodes, into the chest wall, center of the chest, heart, through the diaphragm, or abdominal lining. Eventually the mesothelioma may spread to distant organs or tissues.

If you're not sure whether you've been exposed to asbestos, this site may help you determine whether you're at risk.


What are the risk factors for mesothelioma?

Working with asbestos is the major risk factor for mesothelioma. A history of asbestos exposure at work is reported in about 70 percent to 80 percent of all cases. However, mesothelioma has been reported in some individuals without any known exposure to asbestos.

Asbestos is the name of a group of minerals that occur naturally as masses of strong, flexible fibers that can be separated into thin threads and woven. Asbestos has been widely used in many industrial products, including cement, brake linings, roof shingles, flooring products, textiles, and insulation. If tiny asbestos particles float in the air, especially during the manufacturing process, they may be inhaled or swallowed, and can cause serious health problems. In addition to mesothelioma, exposure to asbestos increases the risk of lung cancer, asbestosis (a noncancerous, chronic lung ailment), and other cancers, such as those of the larynx and kidney.

Smoking does not appear to increase the risk of mesothelioma. However, the combination of smoking and asbestos exposure significantly increases a person's risk of developing cancer of the air passageways in the lung.


Who is at increased risk for developing mesothelioma?

Asbestos has been mined and used commercially since the late 1800s. Its use greatly increased during World War II. Since the early 1940s, millions of American workers have been exposed to asbestos dust. Initially, the risks associated with asbestos exposure were not known. However, an increased risk of developing mesothelioma was later found among shipyard workers, people who work in asbestos mines and mills, producers of asbestos products, workers in the heating and construction industries, and other tradespeople. Today, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) sets limits for acceptable levels of asbestos exposure in the workplace. People who work with asbestos wear personal protective equipment to lower their risk of exposure.

The risk of asbestos-related disease increases with heavier exposure to asbestos and longer exposure time. However, some individuals with only brief exposures have developed mesothelioma. On the other hand, not all workers who are heavily exposed develop asbestos-related diseases.

There is some evidence that family members and others living with asbestos workers have an increased risk of developing mesothelioma, and possibly other asbestos-related diseases. This risk may be the result of exposure to asbestos dust brought home on the clothing and hair of asbestos workers. To reduce the chance of exposing family members to asbestos fibers, asbestos workers are usually required to shower and change their clothing before leaving the workplace.

Abestos

Abestos: did you mean asbestos? Common mispellings of asbestos include aspestis, aspestos, & asbestoes.

Visit the Mesothelioma Center site for more information on mesothelioma.


This site is dedicated to providing the most up to date information and support for those who suffer from the lung cancer mesothelioma, also known as asbestos cancer, or who know someone who does. We diligently seek new information and we are available to help you find answers for your individual situation.

You may e-mail us right now or call us at (412)-471-3980.

Asbestos Cancer Lawyer

With a century of medical evidence, secret memos, and long-winded depositions, asbestos attorneys have their work cut out for them. Couple this with the task of finding specific job sites and products for each client, and it's clear to see why asbestos lawsuits are complex.

Asbestos lawyers who have been involved since the beginning have the experience and knowledge to aggressively try you case. [Asbestos Cancer Lawyers.]

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